Indy Legends mod

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Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:06



1967 STP-Paxton Turbocar
The STP-Paxton Turbocar was a racing car, designed by Ken Wallis as the STP entry in the Indianapolis 500.

History
Wallis, a distant relative of famed British engineer Barnes Wallis, had developed a workable plan for harnessing a gas turbine to a race car. He first presented the idea to Dan Gurney, who passed on the idea. Wallis then offered the plan to Carroll Shelby and Shelby said (according to later court testimony), "Hogwash." Finally, Andy Granatelli of STP expressed interest in the concept. Wallis and his crew moved in with Andy's brother Joe at STP's Paxton division in Santa Monica, and they began work on the turbocar in January 1966. It was Granatelli who introduced a side-by-side concept — that is, putting the mid-mounted (relative to the wheelbase) engine at the driver's left (a similar idea, with the driver in an offset gondola on the left, had been used by Smokey Yunick several years earlier). Granatelli also added four-wheel drive to the design.
The aluminum frame of the car was badly warped during heat treating in early 1966, eliminating any possibility of the car racing in the 1966 Indianapolis 500.Work started over again and the car was ready for the 1967 Indianapolis 500. Parnelli Jones drove the car during tire testing in Phoenix early that year and was impressed with the car. He agreed to drive the car in the Indianapolis 500 after being offered $100,000 and half of any prize money he won.
Jones qualified the car at Indianapolis in sixth place at 166.075 mph. At the start of the race, he quickly took the lead and rarely relinquished it. However, with just eight miles left to go, he coasted into the pits with a transmission bearing failure.The car was refurbished and entered by STP in the 1968 Indianapolis 500. Driven by Joe Leonard, the car crashed into the wall during qualifying and never raced again.
The car was originally donated to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History by the STP Corporation. It is currently on loan to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum.Curiously, rather than model this car Mattel chose to make a model of the similar "Shelby Turbine" which practised at Indianapolis in 1968 as one of the popular Hot Wheels toy cars. The Lotus 56 used a modified version of the same engine and 4 wheel drive in a more advanced wedge-shaped body with new USAC intake restrictions, but one car crashed and the 3 entered into the race did not finish either before USAC banned turbine and 4-wheel drive cars entirely.
The STP-Paxton Turbocar was built around an aluminum box-shaped backbone. The driver was seated on the right side of the backbone, while the engine, a Pratt & Whitney Canada ST6B-62 turbine engine, was mounted on the left side of the backbone. Though never successful as an automobile powerplant, the small aircraft engine it was based on would become one of the most popular turboprop aircraft engines in history. The engine drove a Ferguson 4-wheel drive system, which transmitted the power to the wheels. A torque converter eliminated the need for a clutch pedal and gearshift. The engine idled at 54% of full throttle, which meant that the driver didn't even have to press the accelerator pedal to pull away; all he had to do was ease his foot off the brake pedal. A movable panel was mounted behind the cockpit, which acted as an airbrake. The suspension's coil springs were located inside the backbone and the suspension A-frames had airfoil cross-sections. The car weighed 1,750 pounds, a few hundred pounds more than the Indy minimum weight of 1,350 pounds.

Design
USAC had limited the engine intake area to 23.999 square inches to limit the turbine's power output, but the engine still produced 550 hp. However, drivers reported that it had a three-second throttle lag. In less than a month after the 1967 Indianapolis 500, USAC cut the allowable turbine air intake area from 23.999 to 15.999 inches and imposed the ruling immediately, although it had been customary to give two years' notice of engine changes.With the reduced inlet area, the maximum lap speed that could be achieved was 161 mph.


fonte: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STP-Paxton_Turbocar


Dernière édition par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:54, édité 1 fois
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:14


1969 Brawner hawk

Indy 500 Winner

1969 was the final year for the Brawner Hawk and it was a season with the highest of highs and the lowest of lows.
The team was sold to Andy Granatelli after Clint started working on the MK III, again incorporating every
painful lesson learned from the year before and powered by a better developed turbo Ford V8. The new
Hawk was still on the leading edge of aerodynamic and mechanical engineering, and still as safe as the breed
allowed while maintaining Clint's commitment to race car strength and integrity.
Unfortunately, Granatelli and Andretti had tasted the Colin Chapman Kool Aid. New, four-wheel-drive Lotus
Fords had been ordered for Indy and Clint couldn't convince his team owner or driver that the Hawk gave
them all the best chance to finally win the 500.
Chapman's Lotus 56s were essentially the same cars Granatelli ran with turbines in 1968 -- but configured
with the comparatively rough, hot and heavy turbocharged DOHC Ford V8 behind the driver. Chapman's
reputation was that of a ‘less is more' designer/builder who would sacrifice strength for outright speed; some
say he thought a race car should cross the finish line and then fall apart, being built to last only as long as it took to win the race.
At Indy it didn't last through practice. The Lotus was fast all right, but the car's hubs were faulty and Andretti
crashed hard before qualifying, suffering burns to his face and completely destroying his new Lotus. There was
a backup Lotus available but Chapman's cars were withdrawn for safety reasons and the Hawk was pressed
back into service.
Clint knew the Lotus cars couldn't take the strains and stresses of Indy so he had the Hawk as ready as he could.
The bright red STP car qualified second behind A.J. Foyt, took the lead in the first turn after the green flag fell and then dropped back when engine temperatures started to rise. After A.J Foyt's Coyote/Ford and Wally
Dallenbach's Eagle/Offy both broke and hard luck Lloyd Ruby ruptured his fuel tank while leaving the pits with the hose still attached, Andretti cruised on to lead 116 of 200 laps, including the last one. Despite keeping his speed reduced in order to make it to the end – the Hawk was getting horrible fuel mileage, the clutch was going and the engine was overheating terribly -- Mario finished two full laps ahead of second place Dan Gurney.
The MK III Brawner Hawk gave Clint his first and only Indy 500 victory after trying every year since 1953. At
season's end the Hawk had again carried Mario Andretti to the USAC National Championship with wins at the
Hanford 200, Trenton 200, Trenton 300, Kent 100 and Riverside 300; Brawner had also prepared the team's
dirt cars that won at Pikes Peak, Nazareth and Springfield.
When the season was over Brawner split with Andretti and Granatelli to start a new team with Arizona driver
Roger McClusky. His new car was called the Scorpion and in 1970 it qualified fourth at Indy but DNF'd with a
suspension failure. Two years later Arizona rookie Jimmy Caruthers finished 11th in Brawner's Scorpion after
starting 31st.
But by then an era was over. The chapter on one of the most successful Indy cars in history during its five year run, as wrenched by Brawner and Jim McGee and driven by Mario Andretti, was forever closed.


fonte:http://brawnerhawk.com/BRAWNER_HAWK_1969.htm


Dernière édition par Luigi 70 le Dim 28 Sep - 19:58, édité 3 fois
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:21


1965/66 Lotus 38

The Lotus 38 was the first mid-engined car to win the Indianapolis 500, in 1965, driven by Jim Clark. It was run by Lotus at Indianapolis from 1965 to 1967; a total of 8 were built, most for use by Lotus, but several were sold for use by other drivers, including A. J. Foyt and Mario Andretti.

Design
It was designed by Colin Chapman and Len Terry as Lotus' 1965 entry for the Indianapolis 500. It was an evolution of the previous Lotus 29 and Lotus 34 Indy designs, but this time with a full monocoque tub chassis; it was powered by the same four-cam Ford V8 fuel injected engine as used in the 34, giving out around 500 bhp. In all of them, the engine was mid-mounted, improving the weight distribution and giving it good handling. The 38 was significantly larger than Formula One cars of the time, but was dwarfed by the massive American roadsters.

The 38 was specially designed with an "offset" suspension, with the car body situated asymmetrically between the wheels, offset to the left using suspension arms of unequal length. Although in theory this was better suited for the ovals (which have only left turns), for example by evening out tyre wear between the two sides, in practise the handling was sufficiently idiosyncratic that the concept never caught on widely.

In the 1965 Indianapolis 500, Clark qualified on the first row, and race was a walkover for him, as he led all but 10 laps, and won with only four other cars on the lead lap, and the rest all at least 2 laps behind. It was payback for losing the race in 1963, when Clark felt that Parnelli Jones' oil spewing car should have been black flagged.

Lotus returned with the 38 in 1966 (when it conceded victory to Graham Hill in a Lola, after some confusion with the scoring due to an erroneous lap chart) and 1967 (when Clark retired early with a blown engine).

Race results
The 38 had proved that mid-engined cars could make the grade at the Brickyard, and the days of the front-engined roadsters were effectively over. Design elements in the 38 were eventually worked into the design of the legendary Lotus 49, and Foyt's early Coyotes (as well as a number of other contemporary Indy cars) were Lotus 38 clones.

fonte:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lotus_38


Dernière édition par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 11:02, édité 2 fois
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:26


1966 Lola T90
Lola's first appearance at the Indianapolis 500 had been in 1965 when Al Unser and Bud Tingelstad raced a pair of T80s, sadly a number of problems largely stemming from late completion that prevented sufficient testing meant they were also-rans. Both drivers complained particularly of a handling problem that caused the car to "heave" as it entered a corner, this was later discovered to be caused by a flaw in the suspension geometry. Despite this, and a number of other teething troubles, Unser finished ninth and Tingelstad ran as high as fifth until a broken casting (not Lola-made) caused a rear wheel to fall off.

For 1966 Lola would return with a new car, the T90, that incorporated all that Eric Broadley had learnt from the previous year's difficult debut.

Lola mechanics prepare the Ford V8 T90 prior to flying it to America. Note the fuel cells and fillers have not yet been fitted.
(The Lola Archive)

The rear view of the T90, the asymmetric suspension is evident as is the "nerf" bar and the slave battery plug on the back of the gearbox.
(The Lola Archive)
The T90 consisted of a aluminium monocoque constructed from the 16-guage aluminium that the Indy regulations stipulated. Sheet steel diaphragms were fitted at the front and the rear of the tub with additional internal stiffness coming from four braces housed within the pontoons that would take the Firestone-designed fuel cells whilst externally a sloping scuttle in front of the instrument panel gave additional rigidity.
Tubular steel subframes were attached to both the front and rear of the chassis, the front subframe carrying the oil tank, radiator and the forward mountings for the lower wishbone. At the rear there were two subframes above and below the two-speed Hewland gearbox, the upper one carrying the attachment point for the single top link and the top spring/damper mounting. The lower subframe had the mounting points for the lower wishbones.

The T90 was designed to accept either the 2.8-litre, 4-cylinder Offenhauser engine or the 4.2-litre 4-cam Ford V8. The Offy, built by Meyer-Drake in California was fitted with Hilborn fuel injection and a Paxton Roots-type supercharger and gave some 520 bhp, the Ford, whilst slightly less powerful, was a more known quantity having won the 1965 race in Jim Clark's Lotus 38.

Graham Hill proudly sits in his winning T90 on the Indianapolis main straight. Hill's car was fitted with the 4.2 litre Ford 4-cam V8.
(The Lola Archive)

A smiling Roger Ward poses alongside the Indianapolis grandstands. Ward's car is powered by the 2.8 litre supercharged Offenhauser engine.
(The Lola Archive)
Front suspension was inboard with fabricated rocker arms at the top operating the coil and damper units and wide-based lower wishbones.
The front anti-roll bar was unusual employing a single bar that linked to the inner ends of the rocker arms via rod ends but was clamped at it's extremities, this allowed for a 60% longer bar than would have otherwise been possible if it had just run between the ends of the two rocker arms.
pic
Rear suspension was fairly conventional with one departure from the norm. At the top of the upright was a single adjustable top link attaching to the top chassis subframe whilst at the bottom a wide-based wishbone (reinforced on the left), mounting to the rear of the upright, was mounted to the lower chassis subframe. There was a single adjustable lateral link running from the lower front of the upright to the subframe that allowed for toe-in alterations. The unusual feature to the design was the single top radius rod, a lower rod was not used to to the difficulty of a suitable chassis attachment point due to the fuel tank design. As was the norm at this time front and rear suspension was offset to the left by three inches, the theory being that this helped the car through the left-hand turns at Indianapolis.

A cutaway of the Lola T90 with the Ford V8 engine.
(The Lola Archive)

The complex anti-surge fuel system of the T90.
(The Lola Archive)
Learning the lesson from 1965 Lola made sure the T90 was ready in plenty of time for the 1966 Indy 500 and the John Mecom Racing Team-entered car made it's debut at the March season opener, held at the Phoenix International Raceway. Success was immediate with Roger Ward finishing second in his Offenhauser-powered T90 and a month later Ward took the winner's laurels at Trenton's 1-mile paved oval when he won a rain-shortened race ahead of Gordon Johncock.

Come the month of May and there were three T90s, all entered by John Mecom's Houston-based team, ready to run at Indy qualifying, Roger Ward in his successful Offenhauser-engined car and Rookies Jackie Stewart and Graham Hill who were both Ford-powered. There was nothing much between the cars at the end of qualifying, Stewart was 11th fastest at a speed of 159.972 mph, Ward 13th at 159.46 mph and Hill 15th at 159.243 mph. Graham Hill replaced the original driver Walt Hansgen who was tragically killed driving a 7-litre Ford GT during the Le Mans Test Days.

The bare tub of the T90, one of the rear subframes can be seen.
(The Lola Archive)

The T90 chassis built to take the supercharged Offenhauser engine.
(The Lola Archive)
The race saw a chaotic opening lap following a collision between two cars at Turn 1 setting off a chain reaction that resulted in eleven cars retiring and the race being stopped for over an hour. The race restarted under a yellow flag and when the green was shown at lap 17 Mario Andretti took the lead but fell away immediately with a damaged engine. Jim Clark then led the field in his Lotus but his car wasn't handling well as a couple of spins, fortunately without damage showed. The race was now between Lloyd Ruby's Eagle and Jackie Stewart's Lola until fuel stops put Clark temporarily back in front. Ruby was soon back in the lead but his car was black-flagged on lap 152 for leaking oil. Ruby's retirement left Stewart's T90 comfortably leading from Clark's Lotus and Graham Hill's T90. Hill had been quietly progressing up the field both by taking advantage of other people's misfortunes as well as driving quickly and avoiding making mistakes, by lap 175 he had passed Clark for second.

Stewart continued to lead until 25 miles from the finish when a sudden lack of oil pressure saw the Scot retire and Hill assume the lead. The T90 didn't miss a beat and at just short of three and a half hours from taking the start Graham Hill and Lola won the 1966 Indianapolis 500.


fonte:http://www.lolaheritage.co.uk/history/types/t90/t90.htm


Dernière édition par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:59, édité 2 fois
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:41


1968 Eagle Olsonite

study ...I'm sorry but at the moment I cannot find the story... scratch
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:46


1963 Lotus 29
With the ground-breaking Type 25 introduced at the 1962 Dutch Grand Prix, Lotus had become one of Formula 1's top runners. Its key strength (literally) was the revolutionary monocoque chassis, which was both lighter and more rigid than the conventional tubular spaceframe chassis. In fact, it was so strong that it allowed Lotus' Colin Chapman to quickly develop a machine for the lucrative Indy 500.

One of the driving forces behind this ambitious project was American Dan Gurney, who convinced Chapman that a mid-engined Lotus would be more than a match for the rather more archaic and much larger Indy 'Roadsters'. He had raced a mid-engined car in the 1962 Indy 500 and believed that a lighter, more efficient machine would be able to break the Roadsters' stronghold. In Ford, where an all-aluminium V8 was under development they found a formidable partner.

Dubbed the Type 29, Lotus' first Indy racer was effectively an enlarged version of the successful F1 car. This was done to meet the minimum wheelbase requirement and to accommodate for the new engine, which was over twice as large as the diminutive Coventry-Climax V8 used in the Type 25. As on the F1 car, the chassis consisted of two sheet aluminium pontoons that were connected by various steel cross-members and double as the bottom of the body.

Also carried over from the Type 25 was the suspension with wishbones and rockers at the front and wishbones, top links and trailing arms at the rear. Both a conventional and an off-set version of the suspension was developed. The later was designed specifically for use on ovals. With formidable performance expected, the car was fitted with the largest disc brakes available. Halibrand knock-off wheels were used to allow for lightning quick pit-stops.

Ford provided a new all-aluminium V8, loosely based on the Fairlane engine. A quad-cam version was in the works but in its original guise the Ford Indy engine used a single camshaft, actuating the valves through push-rods and rockers. Lotus replaced the Hilborn fuel injection with four Weber carburettors, which the British mechanics were much more accustomed to. In this guise, the 4.2 litre V8 produced around 400 bhp. It was mated to a Colotti four-speed gearbox with two gears blanked off.

Chapman had very high hopes for the car, which he believed was one of the fastest racing cars ever built. The Lotus 29 showed its potential in testing, shattering the lap record at Snetterton. The prototype was then shipped to the United States for further testing at Ford's private track in Arizona. Meanwhile two new chassis were readied for Jim Clark and Dan Gurney to drive in the Indy 500. Clark's car was painted in Lotus' familiar green and yellow, while Gurney's 29 sported a variation of the American white and blue racing colours.

In practice the big Roadsters still proved to be faster but it was part of Lotus' strategy to make fewer pit-stops with their lighter and more frugal machine. Clark, the only non-American in the race, nevertheless set the fifth fastest time. For Gurney, the practice sessions were not quite as straightforward as he crashed his 29. The car was hastily repaired, using parts from the original prototype. He would start the race from 12th on the grid.

The Lotus strategy seemed to pay off as after running 9th and 10th early on, Clark and Gurney moved into the lead after the first round of pit stops. Clark eventually only had to stop once compared to Gurney's three stops. This placed the young Scotsman right on the tail of Parnelli Jones' Watson Offenhauser, which was spewing oil badly. Despite Chapman's pleas, Jones was not black flagged and would go on to take the win. Clark had to settle for second, while Gurney ended the race in seventh place.

Although the Indy 500 had turned out to be the single most lucrative race Lotus had competed in, Chapman still had a point to prove. He entered Clark in the Milwaukee 200-mile race where he led from start to finish and set a new lap record. Ford acquired Gurney's car and used to test the new quad-cam engine. It was raced in the 1964 Indy 500 by Bobby Marshman, who briefly led the race before being side-lined with engine issues. The car was back in 1965 when Al Miller finished fourth.

For Lotus and Ford, the Type 29 was just the beginning and over the winter the new Type 34 was readied. Powered by the quad-cam engine, it had a disastrous race in 1964 due to tyre problems. It would turn out to be third time luck for the Lotus-Ford partnership as Clark would go on to win the 1965 Indy 500, finally breaking the Roadster stronghold on the legendary race. Although overshadowed by its successors, the Type 29 did remarkably well to finish second and seventh at what was the manufacturer's debut in the Indy 500.


fonte:http://www.ultimatecarpage.com/car/5336/Lotus-29-Ford.html


Dernière édition par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 11:05, édité 1 fois
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 10:52


1968 Lotus 56
The Lotus 56 was a racing car, designed by Maurice Philippe as Team Lotus' 1968 entry in the Indianapolis 500, replacing the successful Lotus 38.

Indy 500
The Lotus 56 used a modified version of the ST6 gas turbine used on the STP-Paxton Turbocar ("Silent Sam") that almost won in 1967. The ST6 was based on a small aircraft engine that would become one of the most popular turboprop aircraft engines in history. But the car itself was an entirely new and more advanced design which introduced a distinctive aerodynamic wedge-shaped body rather than a cigar-shape, just a few years before the introduction of front and rear wings.USAC, the governing body of the Indy 500, had implemented new rules aimed at handicapping turbine powered racing cars by drastically reducing the air intake size. The Lotus 56 made up for reduced power with a sophisticated suspension design, retaining the 4 wheel drive concept of the Silent Sam, but with lighter weight, and advanced aerodynamics.

Lotus had suffered the death of Lotus' ace driver Jim Clark in a Formula 2 race in Germany. Mike Spence was killed at Indianapolis while testing one of four 56's built. The remaining three cars with Graham Hill, Joe Leonard, and Art Pollard were entered for the race, with Leonard claiming pole position. Unlike the year before, when the STP-Paxton Turbocar easily outperformed the other cars in the race, in the race the turbine cars were relatively evenly matched with the other top contenders, much of which must be attributed to aerodynamics and chassis design and not to the turbine engine. Hill's car crashed, Pollard's car broke down, while Leonard was leading with just a handful of laps to go when the a fuel pump shaft failed. Shortly thereafter, the USAC imposed additional restrictions on turbine cars that essentially removed them from competition. For the second year in a row STP turbine cars had brought innovation to the Indy 500 and had failed to win while leading within a few laps of the end of the race. USAC subsequently banned turbine cars and four-wheel drive completely, but it was unusual enough that Mattel produced as model as the "Lotus Turbine" as one of the popular mass-produced die cast Hot Wheels cars.


In 1971 the Lotus 56 was raced in Formula 1 on occasion by Team Lotus but the large fuel tanks required to allow it to run an entire race without refueling left it overweight and uncompetitive.

The Lotus 56, while never winning a race, demonstrated the importance of aerodynamics in racing cars, along with Jim Hall's Chaparrals, and effectively set the mold for open wheeled racing cars for the next ten years. Chapman's Lotus 72 employed the same wedge nose shape and went on to win three world championships in Formula 1.

fonte:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lotus_56
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 16:44

1968 Brawner Hawk


Which Way to Go

The 1967 Indycar season was one of surprises, as a turbine car dominated the 500 and turbocharging was
starting to become the newest rage. That meant engine choice became Brawner's top priority as the Hawk
MK II was still one of the best handling and sturdiest cars in the series.

However, Clint never liked to sit still. He converted the Hawk to a full monocoque chassis, still featuring the
normally aspirated Ford as the powerplant and designing it to be even smoother and slicker than the
previous version. The 1968 Hawk, sponsored by Overseas National Airways, was easily the most beautiful
Indy car Brawner ever rolled to a grid.

The 1968 season was one of frustration, though. The state-of-the-art in 1964 DOHC Ford was no longer
competitive with the turbo Offy's and after the Indy 500 Brawner also had four-wheel-drive, turbine powered
Lotus's to race against. By Indy the Ford behind Andretti had become turbocharged but after a DNF/last
place finish at the 500 and a big blow up at Langhorne – the first turbo Fords were notoriously unreliable --
the fiercely loyal Brawner had to switch to the sorted turbo Offenhauser. By the end of the season the Hawk
was back with Big Blue and still had a decent record, winning the twin races at St. Jovite and the Trenton 200
while qualifying on pole six times. The team won two dirt races too but lost the championship by 11 points.

Clint Brawner tired quickly of team ownership.


fonte:http://brawnerhawk.com/BRAWNER_HAWK_1968.htm
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Luigi 70 le Sam 27 Sep - 17:24

ok guys,
the cars that should be ready are 14, to get to 22 I should be doing other 8 cars ...
I had thought to these cars:
1966 Bryant Lola T90 #26 Roger Ward
1966 Bardhal Eagle # 14 Lloyd Ruby
1967 Coyote sheraton thompson special #14 A. J. Foyt
1968 Olsonite Eagle # 42 Denny Hulme
1968 Rislone Special # 3 Bobby Unser
1968 Sunoco Eagle # 12 Mark Donohue
1969 Shelby Turnine # 66 Bruce Mc Laren
1969 Shelby Turnine # 69 Denny Hulme

Have you any suggestions Question
(I recommend "keep calm and one comment at a time") Laughing
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Re: Indy Legends mod

Message par Wookey le Sam 27 Sep - 19:57

Wow ! this gives me the will to re use all the ovals I dont know what to do with Smile
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Re: Indy Legends mod

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